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Burlington House

A Virtual Tour of the RAS Premises: Ground Floor

The Fellows Room

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The Fellows Room is a comfortable room where Fellows of the Society can work, relax or meet. There are comfortable seats, two desks, and a coffee machine. Wireless internet access is available, for Fellows to pursue Society related activities. A plasma screen over the fireplace can relay audio and video from meetings held in the lecture theatre. The room also holds a small number of astronomical artefacts. Before 2007 this room was used as the Council Room of the Society.

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The Fellows Room is dominated by a 2007 painting by Anthony Whishaw RA, entitled Celestial II. It is acrylic on canvas and measures 66 x 90 inches.

 

The lecture theatre

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The lecture theatre can seat 100 and has state of the art audio-visual equipment. There is a giant projection screen with slave plasma screens on either side. The Council Room and Fellows Room can serve as overflow venues, receiving live streams of the presentation, together with audio and video of the speaker. There is a hearing loop for the hearing impaired and space for two wheelchairs. There is provision for up to 6 laptops on the dais so that at multi-speaker events speakers can set up prior to the start of the meeting. TV broadcasts, through a satellite receiver, can be shown on the screens.

This room was originally the Meeting Room of the Society, but was partitioned in 1969, when it was divided up to make offices. In 2007 it was returned to its original purpose and the suspended ceiling which hid a fine moulded ceiling removed.

 

The Executive Secretary’s office

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The office of the Executive Secretary is also used as a small meeting room for up to eight people. It contains a display cabinet, designed on the old Radcliffe Observatory at Oxford, displaying some of the Society’s more interesting items.

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Just outside the office is the Society’s Royal Charter from 1831. It is rather plain, unlike some of the coloured hand-painted charters of the same time.

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Also of interest: A brief history of the Society