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Our Beautiful Universe

OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: Chandra’s vision: high energy universe
In celebration of NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory’s 15th year of operation, the mission team has selected some highlights from Chandra’s vast dataset covering the high-energy universe. This is one of six new images selected to highlight Chandra’s contribution to understanding the universe by combining mission... More
Published on Monday, 01 December 2014 14:32
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: John Herschel’s discoveries in close-up
Two star-forming regions in the Milky Way, NGC 3603 (left) and NGC 3576 (right). (ESO/G Beccari)  Here, in one image from the European Southern Observatory’s Wide Field Imager at La Silla Observatory, Chile, are two star-formation regions in the Milky Way, both discovered by John Herschel in 1834. Herschel was... More
Published on Wednesday, 01 October 2014 09:14
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: Astrophotographers and space telescopes join forces
Centaurus A. (X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: Rolf Olsen; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech)  A new form of professional and amateur collaboration in astronomy has seen amateur astrophotographers combining their images with data from the Chandra and Spitzer space observatories in a multiwavelength project called Astro Pro-Am. The... More
Published on Sunday, 08 June 2014 10:49
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: Catastrophic flood regions on Mars
Part of the Osuga Valles outflow region on Mars. (ESA/DLR/FU Berlin)  The High Resolution Stereo Camera on ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft has highlighted details of the fast-flowing water and catastrophic flooding that carved a gorge south of the southeastern rim of the vast Valles Marineris canyon system. The image... More
Published on Sunday, 01 June 2014 10:40
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: Radioactivity maps Cas A detonation
Supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/CXC/SAO) NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array – NuSTAR – has made the first map of the distribution of radioactive titanium-44 in supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. In the image, the distribution of 44Ti is shown in blue, where NuSTAR detected X-rays at energies... More
Published on Thursday, 01 May 2014 00:00
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: A fresh impact on Mars
A relatively new impact crater on Mars, about 30m diameter. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona) This image from the HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows a fresh impact crater at 3.7°N, 53.4°E. The image was taken on 19 November 2013, in response to changes... More
Published on Tuesday, 01 April 2014 00:00
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: Dawn delivers composition maps of Vesta
Mineral flow on the asteroid Vesta. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLAMPS/DLR/IDA)  Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany, have used the multiwavelength filters on NASA’s Dawn spacecraft to create compositional maps of the surface of the asteroid Vesta, which Dawn... More
Published on Saturday, 01 February 2014 14:10
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: ALMA takes aim at jets
Jets stream away from the young star Herbig-Haro 46/47 in the southern sky constellation of Vela. (ESO/ALMA [ESO/NAOJ/NRAO]/H Arce/B Reipurth) While still under construction, the Atacama Large Millimetre Array has produced this image of jets streaming away from a young star, including one previously unknown jet. The ALMA data... More
Published on Tuesday, 08 October 2013 00:00
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: Spitzer at 10
The Carina Nebula. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)The infrared observatory Spitzer has been at work for 10 years, revealing the cool dusty regions where stars and planets form, as well as shedding light on planets, exoplanets, stars and galaxies. Spitzer data have brought a better understanding of the Milky Way’s spiral arm structure, led... More
Published on Tuesday, 01 October 2013 00:00
 
OUR BEAUTIFUL UNIVERSE: Cassini sees hurricane in Saturn’s hexagon
A false-colour image of the north polar region of Saturn using filters sensitive to near-infrared light: wavelengths of 890  nm are projected as blue, 728  nm as green, and 752  nm as red. Red indicates low clouds and green indicates high ones. The image was taken from a distance of 419,000  km.... More
Published on Saturday, 08 June 2013 00:00