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RAS Meetings

The RAS holds regular monthly meetings from October to May covering all aspects of astronomy and solid-earth geophysics, planetary sciences and solar-terrestrial physics. Usually, a pair of Specialist Discussion meetings for Fellows are followed by a more general Astronomy & Geophysics ('Ordinary') meeting, open to the public, of which a number of the talks are available here Ordinary Meeting Videos.

These regular meetings are held on the second Friday of the month, normally in the RAS and Geological Society lecture theatres (both at Burlington House, London). A map to these locations can be found here, and webcasts/podcasts of a number of meetings are available.

E-bulletins summarising imminent meetings can be subscribed to freely.

 

Specialist Discussion Meetings cover all branches of astrophysics and solid-earth geophysics (including, but not limited to, cosmology, astrobiology, astrochemistry, astroparticle physics, computational astrophysics; geophysical fluid dynamics, planetary sciences, solar-terrestrial physics). If you would like to give a talk at a Specialist Discussion Meeting, please contact the Meeting Organizer.

 

'Astronomy & Geophysics' (A&G) meetings, also called Ordinary Meetings, have more diverse programmes of talks, at a level accessible to a general audience of scientists (and advanced amateurs).  If you would like to give a talk at an A&G Meeting, please contact the Senior Secretary.

A&G Meetings are open to all, with free admission. Registration charges are levied for the February BGA meeting, and for non-Fellows attending any RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting.




National Astronomy Meeting (NAM) 2017
Date: 2 Jul 2017
Time: 18:00

The Royal Astronomical Society is proud to present the National Astronomy Meeting from 2nd - 6th July 2017.

The E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Hull will be hosting the UK National Astronomy Meeting, where we will bring together hundreds of delegates from the UK astronomy community.

NAM2017 will feature a wide-ranging scientific programme in parallel with exciting outreach and cultural events.

NAM2017 is part of Hull - City of Culture Programme in 2017.

 

For further details and to register: https://nam2017.org/

 



New frontiers in galaxy-evolution modelling: hydro-dynamical simulations in cosmological volumes
Date: 13 Oct 2017
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discusion Meeting organised by *Sugata Kaviraj (Hertfordshire);
Sadegh Khochfar (Edinburgh); Julien Devriendt (Oxford); Richard Bower (Durham); Debora Sijacki (Cambridge)

 *s.kaviraj@herts.ac.uk

 

A significant and exciting recent advance in galaxy evolution modelling is the advent of full hydro-dynamical simulations in cosmological volumes, which offer detailed survey-scale predictions that can be compared to current and future surveys. UK researchers, with their strong tradition of leadership in theoretical modelling, have leading roles in the development and exploitation of these simulations (e.g. HORIZON-AGN, EAGLE, Illustris). In concert with current and future observational datasets, these models will, over the next few years, play a fundamental role in understanding the processes that drive stellar mass and black-hole growth and morphological transformations over cosmic time.

 
This one-day meeting aims to (1) bring together theorists from across the UK, in order to foster collaboration between different simulation groups, (2) inform the UK’s observational community of the capabilities of today’s state-of-the-art simulations, and (3) lay the groundwork for the exploitation of forthcoming datasets, by stimulating collaborations between theorists and observers. By providing a focal point for theorists, and bridging the gap between theorists and observers, this meeting will enable the UK community to better position itself, both for the exploitation of current instruments, and for the theoretical analysis of data from next-generation Big Data facilities like LSST, EUCLID and the SKA, in which the UK community has a significant stake.
 

 https://hydrosimulations.wordpress.com/

 




Science of Primitive Asteroid Sample Return Missions
Date: 13 Oct 2017
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by *Kerri Donaldson Hanna (Oxford); Neil Bowles (Oxford); Ian Franchi (OU); Ben Rozitis (OU); Ashley King (NHM); Sara Russell (NHM)

*Kerri.DonaldsonHanna@physics.ox.ac.uk

 




RAS Ordinary Meeting
Date: 13 Oct 2017
Time: 16:00

Talks tba




Solar Orbiter: Synergy between Observations and Theory
Date: 10 Nov 2017
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting Organisers: Duncan Mackay (St. Andrews); Andrzej Fludra (RAL); Louise Harra (MSSL); Tim Horbury (Imperial); Chris Owen (MSSL)

 

*dhm@st-andrews.ac.uk




The Initial Mass Function, from Top to Bottom
Date: 10 Nov 2017
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by *R.J. Smith (Durham); R.L. Davies (Oxford); I. Ferreras (UCL); C. Maraston (Portsmouth); D. Thomas (Portsmouth);

 
*russell.smith@durham.ac.uk

 




RAS Ordinary Meeting
Date: 10 Nov 2017
Time: 16:00

Talks tba




Dynamic coupling in the terrestrial atmosphere (joint with RMetSoc)
Date: 8 Dec 2017
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion organised by *Tracy Moffat-Griffin (BAS); Andrew Kavanagh (BAS); Nick Mitchell; Alan Gadian


* tmof@bas.ac.uk

 




The link between AGN and galaxy formation
Date: 8 Dec 2017
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion organised by Prof Peter Thomas (Sussex);
Dr James Mullaney (Sheffield)

 

*p.a.thomas@sussex.ac.uk




RAS Ordinary Meeting
Date: 8 Dec 2017
Time: 16:00

Talks tba




The Extremely Large Telescope: UK Community Day
Date: 12 Jan 2018
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by  *Aprajita Verma (Oxford)
Chris Evans; Sandi Wilson; Isobel Hook


* aprajita.verma@physics.ox.ac.uk




Wave-based heating in the solar atmosphere
Date: 12 Jan 2018
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by Paolo Pagano (St. Andrews);
Patrick Antolin (St. Andrews); Ineke de Moortel (St. Andrews); Sergiy Shelyag (Northumbria)

 *pp25@st-andrews.ac.uk

 

Magnetohydrodynamic waves permeate the solar atmosphere but despite being regularly observed and analysed in great detail, their role in the energy transport through the solar atmosphere and in heating the solar corona remains unclear. This is largely due to the complexity and dynamism of the solar atmosphere where the combination of gravitational stratification, magnetic field expansion and local density inhomogeneities leads to complicated coupling and interactions between different layers of the solar atmosphere.


Various modelling techniques, including numerical simulations and forward modelling, allow us to tackle this complexity and investigate the various wave processes. Constraints on the energy budget, identification of the dissipation mechanisms and determination of the spatial and temporal scales of the energy deposition and the observational signatures can thus be obtained.


In this RAS Specialist Discussion meeting, we aim to bring together experts in numerical modelling, observational detection and theoretical analysis of wave-based heating mechanism to shed light on the role of MHD waves in coronal heating. We will focus in particular on recent advancements in this field due to the use of increasingly complex numerical experiments.




From the Outer to the Inner Solar system: The Origin and Evolution of Comets
Date: 9 Feb 2018
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by *Alan Fitzsimons (QUB); Stephen Lowry (Kent);Colin Snodgrass (Open University)


* a.fitzsimmons@qub.ac.uk




The Epoch of Reionisation: UK community update
Date: 9 Feb 2018
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by Emma Chapman (Imperial);
Suman Majumdar (UCL); Catherine Watkinson (Imperial)


* e.chapman@imperial.ac.uk




RAS Ordinary Meeting
Date: 9 Feb 2018
Time: 16:00

Talks tba




Ground effects of severe space weather events
Date: 9 Mar 2018
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by *Ciaran Beggan (BGS); Jim Wild (Lancaster); Mark Gibbs (Met Office)

* ciar@bgs.ac.uk

 

As a society, the UK is reliant on continuously available electricity supplies and technology such as instantaneous satellite data and communications in order to function safely and efficiently. For example, systems such as transportation networks are increasingly automated and the computer networks which run them require accurate real-time information from embedded electronic sensors and other peripheral data such as timing derived from GPS. However, this dependence increases the exposure to impacts on technology from so-called severe space weather events. Space weather is usually defined as the response of Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere to sudden rapid changes in the properties of the solar wind such as increases in speed, density and magnetic field strength.
These changes in the magnetosphere and ionosphere cause the magnetic field at the Earth's surface to vary rapidly giving rise to geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) which can flow through conductive grounded equipment, such as high-voltage transformers, affecting the reliability of electricity supplies. The additional energy input from the solar wind also changes the conductivity structure of the ionosphere and pushes the auroral oval equatorward. This affects the propagation of radio waves through the atmosphere delaying GPS signals and leading to spatial and temporal errors on the ground; HF communications to circumpolar aircraft may also be disrupted. As well as the impact on electricity grids, GICs also cause additional unwanted corrosion in pipelines and the potential for signalling or other faults to develop in rail networks.


We seek presentations on a broad topic of ground effect of space weather in the UK (but specifically excluding satellite or spacecraft effects), in particular to GIC in power networks, railways and pipelines and topics such as impacts on surveyors and others end users (e.g. airlines/port authorities) of precise GPS location and timing data.


This specialist discussion meeting, aimed at academic and industry researchers and relevant end users, will discuss the latest research in the UK on understanding and ameliorating these impacts in light of recent developments in the field.




Merging giant-star asteroseismology with the fate of extrasolar planetary systems
Date: 9 Mar 2018
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discusion organised by *Dr Tiago Campante (Birmingham); Dr Dimitri Veras (Warwick)


* campante@bison.ph.bham.ac.uk




RAS Ordinary Meeting
Date: 9 Mar 2018
Time: 16:00

Talks tba




Dynamics and evolution of Earth’s coupled core-mantle system
Date: 11 May 2018
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by Chris Davies (Leeds);
Andy Biggin (Liverpool); Dario Alfe (UCL)


* C.Davies@leeds.ac.uk




The Gravitational Wave Binary Black Hole Opportunity For Astronomy
Date: 11 May 2018
Time: 10:30

A RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by *Carole Mundell (Bath); Samaya Nissanke (Radboud); Hiranya Peiris (UCL)


* samaya@astro.ru.nl




RAS AGM
Date: 11 May 2018
Time: 16:00



RAS Ordinary Meeting
Date: 11 May 2018
Time: 17:00

Talks tba




 

NOTES
  • Fees: Admission to the Society's Monthly A&G (Ordinary) Meetings is open to all, at no charge. Admission to the Specialist Discussion Meetings is normally free to RAS members and £15 to non-members (£5 to students), collected on the door, while  GSL members may normally attend "G" meetings at no charge. Note that special rates apply for the February BGA meeting. RAS and GSL members should bring their membership cards, and students their student cards, as identification.
  • Tea will be served before A&G meetings (15:30, at Geological Society Lecture Theatre, Burlington House). A drinks reception will follow A&G meetings, in the Burlington House apartments of Royal Astronomical Society.
  • Coffee/registration for Specialist Discussion Meetings will commence a half-hour before the formal start time.
  • Copies of the detailed programme will be circulated, to those who have asked for them, approximately two weeks in advance of each meeting. Any member who does not already receive these details but wishes to do so should notify the Executive Director.
  • Those wishing to make a contribution at a Specialist Discussion Meeting should contact the appropriate organizers.
  • The Society welcomes suggestions for venues and topics for half- or one-day regional meetings; contact the Secretary or Executive Director.
  • Detailed notes for organizers (including the Code of Conduct for RAS meetings) are available for reference.