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NAM 09: Could low-cost space missions keep astronomy aiming high?
 Whether in the present so-called 'age of austerity' or more generous times, arguing for funds for space exploration can sometimes be hard and constrained budgets mean that some excellent scientific proposals never see the light of day. On Tuesday 19 April, in his presentation at the National Astronomy Meeting in... More
Last updated on Tuesday, 19 April 2011 08:18
Published on Friday, 15 April 2011 15:09
 
NAM 08: Astronomers can tune in to radio auroras to find exoplanets
  Detecting exoplanets that orbit at large distances from their star remains a challenge for planet hunters.  Now, scientists at the University of Leicester have shown that emissions from the radio aurora of planets like Jupiter should be detectable by radio telescopes such as LOFAR, which will be completed later this... More
Last updated on Monday, 18 April 2011 16:56
Published on Friday, 15 April 2011 12:35
 
NAM 07: Plasmoids and sheaths mean success or failure for solar eruptions
Our Sun experiences regular eruptions of material into space, but solar physicists still have difficulty in explaining why these dramatic events take place. Now a group of scientists from the University of St Andrews think they have the answer: clouds of ionized gas (plasma) constrained by magnetic fields and known as... More
Last updated on Monday, 18 April 2011 08:50
Published on Friday, 15 April 2011 13:52
 
NAM 06: Watching the birth of a sunspot
  Researchers at the University of Central Lancashire have monitored the birth of a sunspot over a period of eight hours using observations from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Dr Stephane Regnier will present the results at the RAS National Astronomy Meeting in Llandudno on Monday 18th April. The emerging... More
Last updated on Monday, 18 April 2011 08:24
Published on Friday, 15 April 2011 12:20
 
NAM 05: School students help astronomers study mysterious X-ray source
  Astronomers from Wales and the Netherlands, in collaboration with five schools, have used eight telescopes simultaneously to study the strange behaviour of an X-ray binary star system.  Results will be presented by postgraduate student Fraser Lewis at the RAS National Astronomy Meeting in Llandudno, Wales, on Monday... More
Last updated on Wednesday, 20 April 2011 16:24
Published on Friday, 15 April 2011 12:41
 
NAM 04: Did a supernova mark the birth of the Merry Monarch?
  An X-ray image of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant made with the Chandra X-ray observatory. Credit: NASA/CXC/MIT/UMass Amherst/M.D.Stage et al. The supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) is the relic of the explosion of a massive star that took place around 11,000 years ago and is one of the brightest radio sources... More
Last updated on Monday, 18 April 2011 08:48
Published on Friday, 15 April 2011 13:44
 
NAM 03: Large galaxies stopped growing 7 billion years ago
  The Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) appears as the orange arc in this section of a Hubble Space Telescope image of galaxy cluster Abell 2218. Credit: NASA, ESA, and Johan Richard (Caltech, USA) Galaxies are thought to develop by the gravitational attraction between and merger of smaller 'sub-galaxies', a process that... More
Last updated on Thursday, 21 April 2011 08:28
Published on Friday, 15 April 2011 13:31
 
POYEKHALI! 50 years of human spaceflight
2011 is the 50th anniversary of the beginning of human space exploration, inaugurated when Yuri Gagarin first orbited the Earth on 12 April 1961. Commemorative events are taking place across the UK over the next few months, coordinated by the Yuri Gagarin 50 group supported by the RAS. See http://yurigagarin50.org for details
Last updated on Wednesday, 13 April 2011 07:31
Published on Tuesday, 12 April 2011 09:08
 
First galaxies could have been born much earlier than expected
Astronomers have found a galaxy that could have formed just 200 million years after the Big Bang. The international team used a natural gravitational lens to spot the newly discovered object in images from the Hubble Space Telescope. It could be a member of a long-sought and large population of galaxies containing stars that... More
Last updated on Wednesday, 13 April 2011 07:47
Published on Wednesday, 13 April 2011 07:31
 
Astronomers find newly-discovered asteroid is Earth's companion
Astronomers from the Armagh Observatory in Northern Ireland have found that a recently discovered asteroid has been following the Earth in its motion around the Sun for at least the past 250,000 years, and may be intimately related to the origin of our planet. Their work appears in a paper in the journal Monthly Notices of the... More
Last updated on Thursday, 07 April 2011 12:58
Published on Wednesday, 06 April 2011 16:36