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RAS PN 08/40: Space and astronomy digest: June 2008

Last Updated on Tuesday, 06 April 2010 15:56
Published on Thursday, 29 May 2008 00:00
The latest news digest from the RAS. This month sees the launch of the GLAST gamma-ray observatory and a major conference on the future of European astronomy.
ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY PRESS INFORMATION NOTE
Date: 29 May 2008
For Immediate Release
Ref.: PN 08/40

Issued by:
Dr Robert Massey
RAS Press Officer
Royal Astronomical Society
Burlington House
Piccadilly
London W1J 0BQ
Tel: +44 (0)794 124 8035, +44 (0)20 7734 4582
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

RAS website: www.ras.org.uk

RAS SPACE AND ASTRONOMY DIGEST: JUNE 2008

This release contains a summary of some astronomical and space events that will be taking place during June. It has been written to assist the media in planning and researching future stories related to space science and astronomy, particularly those with UK involvement. It is not intended to be fully comprehensive. Dates and times may be subject to change.

3 JUNE: LAUNCH OF GLAST MISSION

On 3 June, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch from Cape Kennedy, Florida, atop a Delta II rocket. GLAST will detect gamma rays, the high-energy electromagnetic radiation emitted by objects such as the nuclei of galaxies, supernova remnants and pulsars. The telescope will orbit the Earth at an altitude of 550 km and has an expected lifetime of 10 years. GLAST was built by scientists and engineers from NASA, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Sweden.

FURTHER INFORMATION


CONTACT

J. D. Harrington
NASA HQ
+1 202 358 5241
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

10 JUNE: RAS LUNCHTIME LECTURE: HUBBLE, BUBBLE, TOIL AND TROUBLE: A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE MOST FAMOUS TELESCOPE EVER MADE: BURLINGTON HOUSE, LONDON

Dr Chris Lintott, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford, STFC Science and Society Fellow and co-presenter of the BBC ‘Sky at Night’ will tell the story of the NASA / ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), in orbit since 1990. This autumn, astronauts aboard the space shuttle Atlantis will carry out one of the most difficult repairs in history, with the aim of restoring the HST to full working order. Dr Lintott’s lecture will tell the HST story, and look forward to the discoveries still to be made.

The lunchtime lectures are open to everyone and take place in the newly-refurbished Burlington House, the headquarters of the RAS off Piccadilly in central London. The lectures take place at 1pm on the first Tuesday of each month from September to June and the audience can take their seats from 12.45.

FURTHER INFORMATION


CONTACT

Robert Massey
Royal Astronomical Society
(Details above)

16-19 JUNE: ASTRONET INFRASTRUCTURE ROADMAP SYMPOSIUM: ARENA AND CONVENTION CENTRE, LIVERPOOL

ASTRONET brings together a consortium of European funding agencies to develop a concise plan for astronomy for the next 15-20 years. Between 16 and 19 June, several hundred astronomers from across the continent will take part in a community consultation where they will debate the ASTRONET Infrastructure Roadmap for the future of European astronomy. The Symposium will bring together experts across the whole of astronomy and space science, including educators and communicators. The outcome of the meeting will be incorporated in the final Roadmap due to be published this autumn.

FURTHER INFORMATION


CONTACT

Siobhan Sheils
Press Office
Liverpool John Moores University
Tel: +44 (0)151 231 3369
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

30 JUNE - 3 JULY: ROYAL SOCIETY SUMMER EXHIBITION, LONDON

The Royal Society's annual Summer Science Exhibition sees the best of the UK's science and technology research on display and features several groups working on space science and astronomy. Visitors will get the chance to meet and talk to the scientists carrying out this cutting-edge work, presented on stands around the Exhibition.

FURTHER INFORMATION
Royal Society
http://royalsociety.org


NOTES FOR EDITORS

The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science. The RAS organizes scientific meetings, publishes international research and review journals, recognizes outstanding achievements by the award of medals and prizes, maintains an extensive library, supports education through grants and outreach activities and represents UK astronomy nationally and internationally. Its more than 3000 members (Fellows), a third based overseas, include scientific researchers in universities, observatories and laboratories as well as historians of astronomy and others.