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Intergalactic magnifying glasses could help astronomers map galaxy centres

Last Updated on Thursday, 27 June 2013 21:59
Published on Sunday, 30 June 2013 23:01

An international team of astronomers may have found a new way to map quasars, the energetic and luminous central regions typically found in distant galaxies. Team leader Prof. Andy Lawrence of the Royal Observatory Edinburgh presents the new results on Monday 1 July at the RAS National Astronomy Meeting in St Andrews, Scotland.

If a star passes too close to a giant black hole found in the centre of a galaxy, it will be shredded by the strong gravitational field. This should produce a flare-up in the brightness of an otherwise normal looking galaxy that then fades over a few months. In a large scale survey Prof. Lawrence and his team studied galaxies to search for this effect, finding flare-ups but with very different behaviour to predictions.

Lawrence quasar smallImages of a quasar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in 2005 and then made with the Liverpool Telescope in 2012. The quasar has brightened dramatically as a result of microlensing. Credit: A. Lawrence and the Liverpool Telescope. Click for a larger image.Instead of seeing a fade over months, the objects they found look like 'normal' quasars, regions in the centre of galaxies where material is swirling around a giant black hole in a disk. The quasars in the survey were not seen a decade ago, so must be at least ten times brighter than before. They are also changing slowly, fading over a timescale of years rather than months.

The biggest surprise however was that the quasars seemed to be at the wrong distance. Measuring the characteristic shift in lines found in the spectrum of the quasars allows astronomers to measure the speed at which they are moving away from the Earth. Knowing the way in which the universe is expanding enables scientists to deduce the distance to each object.

In the new survey, the quasars are typically around 8 billion light years away, whereas the galaxies that host them are 3.4 billion light years distant. It could be that the estimated galaxy distances are wrong and that the black holes in the centre of the galaxies have flared up dramatically. But past studies of thousands of well known quasars have never shown events on this scale.

If however the estimated galaxy distances are right, then Prof. Lawrence and his team believe they are looking at a distant quasar through a foreground galaxy. Normally this has little effect on the light of the quasar, but if a single star in the foreground galaxy passes exactly in front of the quasar, it can produce a gravitational focusing of the light which makes the background quasar seem temporarily much brighter.

Lawrence cartoon smallIllustration of the effect of gravitational microlensing on a distant quasar. Credit : Jason Cowan, Astronomy Technology Centre; adapted from a figure made by NASA. Click for a larger imageThis "microlensing" phenomenon is well known inside our own Galaxy, producing a brightening when one star passes in front of another. (It is for example also now being used to detect exoplanets). Microlensing may also be the cause of low-level "flickering" seen in some quasars. But this is the first time it has been suggested to cause such giant brightening events.

Prof. Lawrence sees real potential in this newly-discovered effect. "This could give us a way to map out the internal structure of quasars in a way that is otherwise impossible, because quasars are so small. As the star moves across the face of the distant quasar, it is like scanning a magnifying glass across it, revealing details that would otherwise simply be impossible to detect."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Science contact

 

Prof. Andy Lawrence
Royal Observatory Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
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Media contacts

Dr Robert Massey
Royal Astronomical Society
Mob: +44 (0)794 124 8035
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Anita Heward
Royal Astronomical Society
Mob: +44 (0)7756 034 243
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Ms Emma Shea
Head of Development Communications
University of St Andrews
Tel: +44 (0)1334 462 167
Mob: +44 (0)785 090 0352
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Landline numbers in NAM 2013 press room (available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from 1-4 July, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 5 July):

Tel: +44 (0)1334 462231, +44 (0)1334 46 2232

An ISDN line is available for radio interviews. Please contact Emma Shea (see above) to request its use.

 


Images and captions

 

https://www.ras.org.uk/images/stories/NAM2013/1July/lawrence%20cartoon.jpg
Image 1: Illustration of the effect of gravitational microlensing on a distant quasar. Credit : Jason Cowan, Astronomy Technology Centre; adapted from a figure made by NASA

 

https://www.ras.org.uk/images/stories/NAM2013/1July/lawrence%20quasar%20comparison.jpg
Image 2: An example of a quasar brightening due to microlensing

On the left hand side is an image of the quasar made in 2005 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. On the right hand side is the same object observed with the Liverpool Telescope in 2012. The microlensing effect has caused it to brighten dramatically. Credit: A. Lawrence and the Liverpool Telescope

 

https://www.ras.org.uk/images/stories/NAM2013/1July/lawrence%20panstarrs.jpg
Image 3: The PanSTARRS telescope in Hawaii. Credit: Rob Ratkowski

 

https://www.ras.org.uk/images/stories/NAM2013/1July/lawrence%20liverpool%20telescope.jpg
Image 4: The Liverpool Telescope in La Palma

 

https://www.ras.org.uk/images/stories/NAM2013/1July/lawrence%20panstarrs-ccd.jpg
Image 5: The extremely large PanSTARRs CCD detector, which made the project possible, being held by Professor John Tonry of the University of Hawaii. Credit : Richard Wainscoat

 

https://www.ras.org.uk/images/stories/NAM2013/1July/lawrence%20light%20curve.jpg
Image 6:  Technical figure comparing light curves (change of brightness with time) for several objects. Credit: A.Lawrence

 

https://www.ras.org.uk/images/stories/NAM2013/1July/lawrence%20distances.jpg
Image 7: Technical figure comparing the quasar distances to the estimated galaxy distances. Credit : A.Lawrence
 


Notes for editors

 

Bringing together more than 600 astronomers and space scientists, the RAS National Astronomy Meeting (NAM 2013) will take place from 1-5 July 2013 at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. The conference is held in conjunction with the UK Solar Physics (UKSP: www.uksolphys.org) and Magnetosphere Ionosphere Solar Terrestrial (MIST: www.mist.ac.uk) meetings. NAM 2013 is principally sponsored by the RAS, STFC and the University of St Andrews and will form part of the ongoing programme to celebrate the University's 600th anniversary.

Meeting arrangements and a full and up to date schedule of the scientific programme can be found on the official website at http://www.nam2013.co.uk

The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS: www.ras.org.uk, Twitter: @royalastrosoc), founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science. The RAS organises scientific meetings, publishes international research and review journals, recognizes outstanding achievements by the award of medals and prizes, maintains an extensive library, supports education through grants and outreach activities and represents UK astronomy nationally and internationally. Its more than 3500 members (Fellows), a third based overseas, include scientific researchers in universities, observatories and laboratories as well as historians of astronomy and others.

The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC: www.stfc.ac.uk, Twitter: @stfc_matters) is keeping the UK at the forefront of international science and tackling some of the most significant challenges facing society such as meeting our future energy needs, monitoring and understanding climate change, and global security. The Council has a broad science portfolio and works with the academic and industrial communities to share its expertise in materials science, space and ground-based astronomy technologies, laser science, microelectronics, wafer scale manufacturing, particle and nuclear physics, alternative energy production, radio communications and radar. It enables UK researchers to access leading international science facilities for example in the area of astronomy, the European Southern Observatory.

Founded in the 15th century, St Andrews is Scotland's first university and the third oldest in the English speaking world. Teaching began in the community of St Andrews in 1410 and the University was formally constituted by the issue of Papal Bull in 1413. The University is now one of Europe's most research intensive seats of learning – over a quarter of its turnover comes from research grants and contracts. It is one of the top rated universities in Europe for research, teaching quality and student satisfaction and is consistently ranked among the UK's top five in leading independent league tables produced by The Times, The Guardian and the Sunday Times.

The University is currently celebrating its 600th anniversary and pursuing a £100 million fundraising campaign, launched by Patron and alumnus HRH Prince William Duke of Cambridge, including £4 million to fund the creation of an 'Other Worlds' Think Tank and Observatory. The new think tank and Observatory project will extend the University of St Andrews' flagship work on extra-solar planets, and provide a creative environment for problem-focused research, education and continuing public engagement.

For further information go to: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/600/

 

The Pan-STARRS Project is being led by the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, and exploits the unique combination of superb observing sites and technical and scientific expertise available in Hawaii. Funding for the development of the observing system has been provided by the United States Air Force Research Laboratory.

The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys (PS1) have been made possible through contributions by the Institute for Astronomy, the University of Hawaii, the Pan-STARRS Project Office, the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes, the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching, The Johns Hopkins University, Durham University, the University of Edinburgh, the Queen's University Belfast, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated, the National Central University of Taiwan, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate, the National Science Foundation Grant No. AST-1238877, and the University of Maryland.

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the author(s), and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration or the National Science Foundation.