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Liverpool Telescope plans double-sized successor

Last Updated on Friday, 28 June 2013 16:13
Published on Monday, 01 July 2013 23:00

Planning is underway for a successor to the world's largest fully robotic telescope. The Liverpool Telescope (LT) is a 2-metre optical telescope located on La Palma that has been in operation since 2004. It has become a leading astronomical facility through its ability to react quickly to observe newly discovered or transient events in the universe, such as the cataclysmic explosions known as Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). It has also been used by more than 2000 schools as part of a thriving outreach programme. Now, the scientific community is being consulted on the facility's successor, LT2. Dr Chris Copperwheat will present the current status of the project and invite feedback from the community at the National Astronomy Meeting in St Andrews on Tuesday 2 July.

The Liverpool Telescope in the snowThe Liverpool Telescope, La Palma, in the snow. Credit: J. Marchant (click to enlarge)Plans for the new telescope are being developed by the Astrophysics Research Institute of Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU), which owns and operates the LT. Already, some criteria have been identified: LT2 will be a 4m-class facility and the preferred location is La Palma.

"We've been having productive talks with the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias and hope to work in partnership with them to realise the project. La Palma is of course one of the best observing sites in the world, and there are obvious logistical benefits to siting LT2 at the same observatory as LT. There are potential science benefits as well - we'll be exploring the possibilities of using the two telescopes together to provide an enhanced capability. La Palma is a northern site but there is still good overlap with the southern sky," said Copperwheat.

Like the current telescope, LT2 will be fully robotic and will be able to make rapid and flexible observations to follow up on discoveries made by other observatories. This application is becoming increasingly important due to current and upcoming large-scale surveys of the night sky: from around 2020, the new US-built Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will begin a 10 year mission in which the entire southern sky is photographed every few nights.

"These surveys will discover large numbers of exotic and rare supernova subtypes, and will also be discovering them at an extremely early point in their evolution. Currently, only a small fraction of transients get any follow-up analysis, and this problem will get even worse in the LSST era. This is where we envisage LT2 coming in to its own," said Copperwheat.

Panoramic view of the Liverpool Telescope360° panorama of the LT and environs, taken while standing on the south-west corner of the open enclosure. Credit: R. Smith (click to enlarge)

LT2 will be designed so that the telescope can slew extremely rapidly and get onto a new target very soon after receiving a 'trigger' from another facility. This is vital in order to catch the light from transient objects that fade extremely rapidly, like GRB afterglows. The aim is for LT2 to be able to detect the target and make follow-up observations in just a few tens of seconds.

"As well as GRB afterglows, there may be rapidly fading transients from more exotic sources. A new gravitational wave detector, Advanced LIGO, should be operational by 2014 – one exciting possibility is that LT2 could make follow-up optical observations of merging neutron stars or black hole binaries that are initially detected through gravitational waves. There will be a lot of competition to detect these and the reaction speed of LT2 might give us an advantage," said Copperwheat.

Whilst transient science will be LT2's core mission, the telescope will also be used for observations of binary systems and variable stars detected by the European Space Agency's Gaia mission, which is due for launch later this year, as well as exoplanets discovered by the next generation of space and ground based missions.

The LJMU team is currently developing an outline of user requirements that they will use to commission a preliminary design for LT2 in the next few months. A white paper on the science case is also planned for the autumn.

"We want very much to engage with the community and would be keen to hear any views on the project at this stage – as we move on we'll be looking to establish more partnerships with groups and institutions in the UK and beyond," said Copperwheat.

 

FURTHER INFORMATION

 

For further details, see:

http://telescope.livjm.ac.uk/lt2/

 

IMAGES

    Eagle NebulaThe Eagle Nebula, imaged with the Liverpool Telescope. Credit: A. Newsam & the LT project (click to enlarge)
  1. 360° panorama of the LT and environs, taken while standing on the south-west corner of the open enclosure. Credit: R. Smith
  2. The Liverpool Telescope, La Palma, in the snow. Credit: J. Marchant
  3. The Liverpool Telescope. Credit: R. Smith
  4. The Eagle Nebula, imaged with the Liverpool Telescope. Credit: A. Newsam & the LT project
  5. Multi-band mosaic of M27, the 'Dumbbell' Nebula. Credit: A. Newsam & the LT project

 

SCIENCE CONTACTS

Dr Chris Copperwheat

Liverpool Telescope 2 Project Scientist
Astrophysics Research Institute
Liverpool John Moores University
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Prof Iain Steele

Liverpool Telescope Director
Astrophysics Research Institute
Liverpool John Moores University
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tel: +44 (0)151 231 2912

 

MEDIA CONTACTS

Dr Robert Massey (for free media registration)

Royal Astronomical Society
Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 3307 / 4582 x214
Mob: +44 (0)794 124 8035
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Ms Anita Heward

Royal Astronomical Society
Mob: +44 (0)7756 034 243
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Ms Emma Shea

Head of Development Communications
University of St Andrews
Tel: +44 (0)1334 462 167
Mob: +44 (0)785 090 0352
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Landline numbers in NAM 2013 press room (available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from 1-4 July, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 5 July):
Tel: +44 (0)1334 462231, +44 (0)1334 46 2232

 

NOTES FOR EDITORS

Bringing together more than 600 astronomers and space scientists, the RAS National Astronomy Meeting (NAM 2013) will take place from 1-5 July 2013 at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. The conference is held in conjunction with the UK Solar Physics (UKSP: www.uksolphys.org) and Magnetosphere Ionosphere Solar Terrestrial (MIST: www.mist.ac.uk) meetings. NAM 2013 is principally sponsored by the RAS, STFC and the University of St Andrews and will form part of the ongoing programme to celebrate the University's 600th anniversary.

Meeting arrangements and a full and up to date schedule of the scientific programme can be found on the official website at http://www.nam2013.co.uk

The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS: www.ras.org.uk, Twitter: @royalastrosoc), founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science. The RAS organises scientific meetings, publishes international research and review journals, recognizes outstanding achievements by the award of medals and prizes, maintains an extensive library, supports education through grants and outreach activities and represents UK astronomy nationally and internationally. Its more than 3500 members (Fellows), a third based overseas, include scientific researchers in universities, observatories and laboratories as well as historians of astronomy and others.

The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC: www.stfc.ac.uk, Twitter: @stfc_matters) is keeping the UK at the forefront of international science and tackling some of the most significant challenges facing society such as meeting our future energy needs, monitoring and understanding climate change, and global security. The Council has a broad science portfolio and works with the academic and industrial communities to share its expertise in materials science, space and ground-based astronomy technologies, laser science, microelectronics, wafer scale manufacturing, particle and nuclear physics, alternative energy production, radio communications and radar. It enables UK researchers to access leading international science facilities for example in the area of astronomy, the European Southern Observatory.

Founded in the 15th century, St Andrews is Scotland's first university and the third oldest in the English speaking world. Teaching began in the community of St Andrews in 1410 and the University was formally constituted by the issue of Papal Bull in 1413. The University is now one of Europe's most research intensive seats of learning – over a quarter of its turnover comes from research grants and contracts. It is one of the top rated universities in Europe for research, teaching quality and student satisfaction and is consistently ranked among the UK's top five in leading independent league tables produced by The Times, The Guardian and the Sunday Times.

The University is currently celebrating its 600th anniversary and pursuing a £100 million fundraising campaign, launched by Patron and alumnus HRH Prince William Duke of Cambridge, including £4 million to fund the creation of an 'Other Worlds' Think Tank and Observatory. The new think tank and Observatory project will extend the University of St Andrews' flagship work on extra-solar planets, and provide a creative environment for problem-focused research, education and continuing public engagement.

For further information go to: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/600/