YOU ARE HERE: Home > Search > Article Archive > News and Press > News 2010 > Spiral, barred, elliptical and irregular: computers automatically classify galaxy shapes

I want information on:

Information for:

Spiral, barred, elliptical and irregular: computers automatically classify galaxy shapes

abell.jpg

Scientists at University College London (UCL) and the University of Cambridge have developed machine-learning codes modelled on the human brain that can be used to classify galaxies accurately and efficiently. Remarkably, the new method is so reliable that it agrees with human classifications more than 90% of the time. The research will appear in a paper in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

 

 

Spiral, barred, elliptical and irregular: computers automatically classify galaxy shapes
Royal Astronomical Society Press Release
RAS PN 10/42
27 May 2010
EMBARGOED UNTIL 0001 BST, 2 JUNE 2010

 

 

 

Spiral, barred, elliptical and irregular: computers automatically classify galaxy shapes

 

Scientists at University College London (UCL) and the University of Cambridge have developed machine-learning codes modelled on the human brain that can be used to classify galaxies accurately and efficiently. Remarkably, the new method is so reliable that it agrees with human classifications more than 90% of the time. The research will appear in a paper in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

 

There are billions of galaxies in the Universe, containing anything between ten million and a trillion stars. They display a wide range of shapes, from elliptical and spiral to much more irregular systems. Large observational projects – such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey – are mapping and imaging a vast number of galaxies. As part of the process of using these data to better understand their origin and evolution, the first step is to classify the types of galaxies within these large samples. The 250,000 members of the public participating in the Galaxy Zoo project recently classified 60 million such galaxies by eye.

 

Now, a team of astronomers has used Galaxy Zoo classifications to train a computer algorithm known as an artificial neural network to recognize the different galaxy types.  The artificial neural network is designed to simulate a biological neural network like those found in living things. It derives complex relationships between inputs such as the shapes, sizes and colours of astrophysical objects and outputs such as their type, mimicking the analysis carried out by the human brain. This method managed to reproduce over 90% of the human classifications of galaxies.

 

“We were astonished that a computer could do so well” says Dr Manda Banerji from the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Cambridge who led the research, which formed part of her PhD thesis at UCL. “This kind of analysis is essential as we are now entering a new age of astronomical surveys. Next generation telescopes now under construction will image hundreds of millions and even billions of galaxies over the coming decade. The numbers are overwhelming and every image cannot viably be studied by the human eye.”

 

A large-scale sky survey in which the UK is playing a leading role is the Dark Energy Survey (DES) due to commence in 2011, which is expected to image 300 million galaxies over 5 years. Another survey called the VISTA Hemisphere Survey being led by astronomers at the University of Cambridge, has just started taking data and will image galaxies over the entire southern hemisphere.

 

Professor Ofer Lahav, head of Astrophysics at UCL and chair of the international DES Science Committee, who supervised Banerji’s thesis, commented: “While human eyes are very efficient in recognizing patterns, clever computational techniques that can reproduce this behaviour are essential as we begin to push the boundaries of our observable Universe and detect more distant galaxies. This study is an important step in that direction.”

 

Contacts

 

Dr Manda Banerji
Institute of Astronomy
University of Cambridge
Tel: +44 (0)1223 765845
Mob: +44 (0)779 294 1499
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~mbanerji/

 

Professor Ofer Lahav
Perren Chair of Astronomy and Head of Astrophysics
University College London
Tel: +44 (0)20 7679 3473
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Dr Robert Massey
Deputy Executive Secretary
(Public Affairs, Policy, Education and Outreach)
Royal Astronomical Society
Tel: +44 (0)20 7734 3307 / 4582 x. 214
Mob: +44 (0)794 124 8035
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Further information

 

The work appears in “Galaxy Zoo: Reproducing Galaxy Morphologies Via Machine Learning”; Banerji M., Lahav O., Lintott C. J., Abdalla F. B., Schawinski K., Bamford S. P., Andreescu D., Murray P., Raddick M. J., Slozar A., Szalay A., Thomas D. and Vandenberg J., Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, in press. A pre-print of the paper can be found at http://arxiv.org/abs/0908.2033.

 

Images and captions

 

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~mbanerji/Research/GalClass/abell.jpg: A picture of the Abell Cluster taken using the Hubble Space Telescope. The picture encapsulates the diversity in galaxy types observed in our Universe. We can see a giant elliptical galaxy at the centre of the cluster, a beautiful spiral in the bottom right-hand corner and many smaller systems displaying a wide range of shapes, sizes and colours. Credit: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA).

 

Notes for editors

 

Galaxy Zoo is an online astronomy project which invites members of the public to assist in classifying galaxies. So far more than 250,000 people have assisted in classifying 60 million galaxies. Galaxy Zoo: Hubble, launched in April 2010, invites participants to classify galaxies in the images from the Hubble Space Telescope. http://www.galaxyzoo.org/

 

The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a planned galaxy survey that will map 300 million galaxies, with the goal of measuring the properties of Dark Energy. http://www.darkenergysurvey.org/

 

The VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) is an all-sky near infra-red survey being conducted on the Visible and Infra-Red Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) in Chile. http://www.vista.ac.uk/

 

The Royal Astronomical Society

 

The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS: www.ras.org.uk), founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science. The RAS organizes scientific meetings, publishes international research and review journals, recognizes outstanding achievements by the award of medals and prizes, maintains an extensive library, supports education through grants and outreach activities and represents UK astronomy nationally and internationally. Its more than 3000 members (Fellows), a third based overseas, include scientific researchers in universities, observatories and laboratories as well as historians of astronomy and others.